Here's What It Took to Make Climbkhana

12 days of filming coupled with snow, rain, hail, fog, and mechanical problems. This was no easy video shoot.

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If you haven't watched Climbkhana, please, do it now. It's nine straight minutes of Ken Block ripping his 1400-horsepower all-wheel drive "Hoonicorn" Mustang up the Pikes Peak hillclimb course in sweet sideways fashion, coming inches from flying off the mountain at nearly every turn.

As quickly as those nine minutes go by, it took a ton of time to actually put Climbkhana together. A slew of weather- and car-related issues plagued the shoot, forcing the Hoonigan team to take three separate trips to Pikes Peak to film the entire thing.

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Larry Chen of Speedhunters was . The first trip, he explains, was beset by rain and mechanical issues with the Hoonicorn. The combination of a 1400-horsepower output and high altitude caused the engine to lose oil multiple times throughout the shoot, forcing Block to stop mid-run. Incidents like this plagued the entire shoot, with the team having to swap engines on location more than once.

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On the second trip, , it snowed at Pikes Peak, covering a third of the mountain road. Additionally, heavy fog ruined visibility. The crew would have to come back a third time to finish filming.

But all the stars aligned on visit number three. Block's car was perfectly reliable, and it was even upgraded with anti-lag. The sun was shining, and thanks to the expertise of directors Brian Scotto and eight-time Pikes Peak champion Jeff Zwart, the Hoonigan team got all the shots they were looking for.

put together a behind-the-scenes video of how Climbkhana was produced so we can see what it really takes to film one of the coolest car videos of the year.

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