SHO Stands For Super High Output And Robocop Looks

Ford's Yamaha-powered sleeper from the '90s is a great deal to be had, available with leather and a manual box.

Regular Car Reviews

Let me start by saying that I know Paul Verhoeven used a beefed up 1985 Ford Taurus in the first Robocop movie, while this red car is a second-generation SHO from 1994. But imagine it in flat black, and tell me it wouldn't be more suited for Robocop than the original!

Either way, the second-generation SHO was launched in 1992 and used pretty much the same drivetrain as the boxier car from 1989, while being advertised as an "executive conference room" with "performing assets." Early cars were also available with a manual, while the later automatics had their engines stroked to 3.2 liters to compensate for the torque converter.

Advertisement - Continue Reading Below
FlickrFord via Alden Jewell

Ford's sleeper could claim the "Super High Output" name courtesy of the Yamaha-designed 3.0 DOHC V6 featuring an iron block with aluminum heads, 24 valves and a variable-length air intake. All that was good for 225 horsepower and an 8500-rpm redline according to Yamaha—though Ford limited it to 7000 rpm to keep its accessories in one piece.

This 3300-lb front-wheel drive highway missile also cost BMW money without a luxury badge back in the day, which is a problem you don't have to face now. Today, a Taurus SHO is a comfortable daily driver with an interior nobody would like to talk about, and a book in the trunk about OBD1 sensor codes you might want to get familiar with.

It can be an especially good deal with a manual, and a low-profile car that enthusiasts will respect. And that's a huge achievement from an early '90s Ford sedan.

Advertisement - Continue Reading Below
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below