Some Cars

More specifically, every cool Porsche 964 you could want.

At its Amelia Island auction in March, RM Sotheby's will offer , one 930. Each one of these cars is remarkable in its own right; seeing them together in one place is extraordinary.

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Patrick Ernzen © 2017 Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s
1989 Porsche 911 Turbo Flachbau

The Flachbau, or Flat Nose, is the most gloriously 1980s of 911s, especially . This one's very desirable among original 911 Turbos, as 1989 was the last year for the model, and the only year Porsche's five-speed G50 gearbox was offered.

Estimate: $200,000 - $250,000

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Patrick Ernzen © 2017 Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s
1991 Porsche 911 Carrera Cup

is the road-going version of the car Porsche built for its one-make race series. It's lightweight, lowered, and track-ready as it sits. Plus, it just looks so good in Grand Prix White.

Estimate: $250,000 - $325,000

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Patrick Ernzen © 2017 Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s
1991 Porsche 911 Turbo 3.3

The , code-named 965, used a version of the original 930 engine, but brought a lot of refinement. This is the most common variant of 964 Turbo, but that doesn't make it any less cool.

Estimate: $200,000 - $250,000

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Patrick Ernzen © 2017 Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s
1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS

In 1992, Porsche brought back name for a street car inspired by the Carrera Cup race car. It didn't get any significant power upgrades, but lots of lightweighting and a revised suspension meant it was still much quicker than the standard 964 Carrera 2.

Estimate: $200,000 - $250,000

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Patrick Ernzen © 2017 Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s
1993 Porsche 911 Carrera RS 3.8

Now here's something that almost never comes up for sale. In 1993, Porsche took a handful of Carrera RSes to the extreme, adding a 3.8-liter motor and extra wide fender flares. It's arguably , and probably the most valuable today.

Estimate: $1,250,000 - $1,500,000

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Patrick Ernzen © 2017 Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s
1993 Porsche 911 RS America

Porsche never sold the 964 Carrera RS in the US, but American enthusiasts sought to change that. Porsche relented in 1993 with the RS America, a stripped-out version of the regular 964 Carrera 2. At the time, it was the cheapest 964 on sale. Now? Not so much.

Estimate: $200,000 - $250,000

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Patrick Ernzen © 2017 Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s
1993 Porsche 911 Carera RSR 3.8

The RSR is the racing version of the RS 3.8. Don't be fooled by the license plate brackets seen here—.

Estimate: $1,200,000 - $1,400,000

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Patrick Ernzen © 2017 Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s
1993 Porsche 911 Turbo S Leichtbau

The 911 Turbo was always intended as a more comfortable, luxurious model, but Porsche Exclusive would sell you if you wanted. These were damn quick cars back in the day, making 375 hp from a 3.3-liter flat-six.

Estimate: $1,000,000 - $1,200,000

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Patrick Ernzen © 2017 Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s
1994 Porsche 911 Speedster

I've never really seen the appeal of the Speedster, but collectors love them. received a shorter windscreen and manual convertible top, but otherwise, it's mostly a standard Carrera 2.

Estimate: $200,000 - $250,000

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Patrick Ernzen © 2017 Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s
1994 Porsche 911 Turbo 3.6

Porsche of its new 3.6-liter flat-six in 1993, finally retiring the old 930 engine.

Estimate: $200,000 - $250,000

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Patrick Ernzen © 2017 Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s
1994 Porsche 911 Turbo S X83 Flachbau

With 964 production winding down in 1994, Porsche built a final run of the Turbo S with its new 3.6-liter engine. was built for the Japanese market and wears a 930-esque flat nose.

Estimated: $500,000 - $650,000

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Patrick Ernzen © 2017 Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s
1994 Porsche 911 Turbo S X85 Flachbau

The was built for the US, and this one features a new flat-nose design with 928-esque headlights. These are exceedingly rare, so you won't likely see another one up for sale for some time.

Estimated: $600,000 - $800,000

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