The V8-Powered Cadillac CT6-V Will Be a Future Classic

As part of GM's massive restructuring announced today, the Cadillac CT6 will end production for North America next year. That means the CT6-V will only be in production for a few months.

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Cadillac

Today, GM announced , with five North American plants to close, including the Detroit-Hamtramck assembly where the Cadillac CT6 is built among other cars. This raised some eyebrows at Road & Track because just this past spring, Cadillac announced two versions of the CT6 (including a CT6-V) that would be powered by a brand-new twin-turbo V8. But with Detroit-Hamtramck scheduled to close in mid-2019, the CT6 is officially dead in North America.

We wondered if we'd ever see V8-powered CT6s in production, given this news. A Cadillac spokesperson told us that both the standard V8 CT6 and CT6-V will be built until the plant closes next year, then no more. That means the V8 CT6 will almost certainly be a very rare machine.

The V8-powered CT6 should be an interesting car because it marries a world-class chassis, with a promising new engine. Called "Blackwing," the motor is a 4.2-liter twin-turbo V8 making 500 hp and 553 lb-ft in base form, and 550 hp and 627-hp in the CT6-V. Serious numbers. It's no modified small block either—this is a thoroughly modern, dual-overhead cam mill with its two turbos nestled in the V for better throttle response. The Blackwing is set to be hand built at GM's Bowling Green, Kentucky plant. A Cadillac spokesperson told us the engine will stay in production after the CT6 is finished. We're not sure what car(s) the Blackwing would make its way in to, but the engine was supposed to be a Cadillac-exclusive.

Cadillac will still make the CT6, but only in China for the Chinese market. If you want a CT6 and you live in North America, you'll likely have until the end of next year to pick one up, at which point Cadillac estimates supply will run out.

We suspect V8-powered CT6s will be future collectibles—it's hard to imagine many will be built in its single-model-year run. Maybe these things will command big money at Barrett-Jackson in 2058.

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